Category: raf

🇬🇧 Gun camera footage from a Spitfire Mk I f…

🇬🇧 Gun camera footage from a Spitfire Mk I fighter of No. 609 Squadron RAF, showing its tracer ammunition hitting a German He III aircraft over Filton, Bristol, England, United Kingdom, 25 Sep 1940.
[Source: Imperial War Museum /
Identification Code 4700-16 CH 1823] #history #ww2 #raf #uk #british
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🇬🇧🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿British fighter Ace Wing Cdr…

🇬🇧🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿British fighter Ace Wing Cdr Thomas “Ginger” Neil died on Wednesday evening (11 July), just three days before his 98th birthday. Neil flew Hurricanes with No 249 Squadron throughout the Battle of Britain.

A pre-war member of the RAFVR, he is credited with having destroyed more than 17 enemy aircraft, most of them during the Battle. He went on to see further action in Malta with No 249 Squadron.

Wing Cdr Neil returned to the UK to fly Spitfires over the Channel and elsewhere during 1943. Attached to the American 9th Air Force in 1944, he took part in the invasion of Normandy and remained with the USAAF until the Allies reached the German border. He later saw action in Burma.

After the war, Wing Cdr Neil spent four years as a service test pilot. He has flown more than 100 types of aircraft.

Wing Cdr Neil leaves three married sons, Terence, Patrick and Ian. His wife Eileen died in 2014. [Photo & Caption via The Battle of Britain Memorial] #history #wwii #ww2 #england #raf #uk #british

🇬🇧 K9795, the 9th production Mk I Supermarin…

🇬🇧 K9795, the 9th production Mk I Supermarine Spitfire, with 19 Squadron Royal Air Force, showing the wooden, two-blade, fixed-pitch propeller, early ‘unblown’ canopy and ‘wraparound’ windscreen without the bulletproof glass plate. The original style of aerial mast is also fitted. 1938. [Photo CH 27 / Imperial War Museum] #ww2 #raf #uk #history #spitfire

Lancasters, taken by John Dibbs.

Lancasters, taken by John Dibbs.

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The unmistakable beauty of the Spitfire. 

The unmistakable beauty of the Spitfire. 

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?? Royal Air Force: Second Tactical Air Force, 1943-1945. Looks…

?? Royal Air Force: Second Tactical Air Force, 1943-1945. Looks like it’s payday. Nice desk. ? [Imperial War Museum / © IWM (CL 296)] #war #history #vintage #retro #guns #gun #ww2 #40s #tank #tanks #1940s #military #battle #warrior #warriors #combat #campaign #battles #wwii #worldwartwo #raf #uk #british

jimbury:Small super late bday gift for @mrsmontgolfier. She…

jimbury:

Small super late bday gift for @mrsmontgolfier. She wanted me to draw our pilot babies: featuring Gerald drawing some pin ups for Billy. Hope it’s alright with you dear :v

[An in-flight view of Whitley Mk.V T4131, EY-W from No 78 RAF …

[An in-flight view of Whitley Mk.V T4131, EY-W from No 78 RAF
Squadron during 1941. Note row of bombs painted on the fuselage nose to
indicate numbers of missions flown over the Third Reich. Photo: Wixey, K. Warpaint. p.11.]

The Armstrong Whitworth Whitley was one of the three
´strategic` bombers types with which Britain went to war in September
1939. The Whitley was concived as a night heavy bomber and was RAF´s first monoplane bomber and the first one to penetrate on Germany.

With a crew of five men, and powered by two Rolls-Royce Merlin X
engines, the Whitley was capable of 230 mph (370 km/h) at 16,400 ft
(5,000 m) and was bombed with up to 7,000 lb (3,175 kg) of bombs in the
fuselage and 14 individual cells in the wings.

[Artist Paul Nash made this watercolour and chalk drawing of Berlin´s RAF
first attack from a set of photographs that Air Ministry sent to him.
It shows an aerial view of four Whitley bombers in flight over a target
area of Berlin. It was made in January 1941. Photo: Imperial War Museum.]

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[The Nash and Thompson Type FN4 rear turret of an Armstrong Whitworth Whitley bomber of No 102 Squadron RAF
at Driffield, Yorkshire, 8 March 1940. It was armed with four ,303 in
Browning machine-guns to protect the plane against night-fighters. Note formation lights lamps below and gunner inside the framed turret. Photo: Imperial War Museum.]

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